About these stay-wet palettes..

You'll have to excuse me- I'm totally into the technical aspects of painting. And here's where I'm currently at with "palette" management"- specifically the excellent Masterson stay-wet palettes which I use a lot with acrylics.

StandoffPalette.jpg

In the beginning, when I first started using them, they were problematic- either drying out too quickly or too saturated with the paint running all over the place. Lately tho, I've got a better way with these palettes. This is after a lot of trial and error- and I mean error!

My new recipe for success: I prep them in the standard way. That's where you soak the sponge, wring out the excess water, and then thoroughly soak their special paper for 15m, then let the excess water drip off before putting sponge and paper back inside the stay wet palette.
I've got the water content on the lean side, it needs less water than you might think to stay hydrated over long periods of time.

StandoffPaletteCloseup.jpg

Because I like to work with pretty fluid color- especially in the beginning stages of a painting, the clean area of the palette can get used up kinda of quickly. I'll clean and scrape away paint to make more room, but at a certain point it's unworkable.
So now what I do is before putting paint on the palette, I put a same size sheet of regular, inexpensive, disposable palette paper down on top of the stay-wet fancy paper. Then, when I need to, I can remove the muddied up used up paper, and save clean paint and special mixtures with a palette knife to a fresh sheet of the same.

Since this dry palette paper tends to curl as soon as you spray water on it, I scrounged around for something to keep it flat.. Aha! I found a bunch of those glass droplets laying around from some party. Turns out they make the perfect little corner weights for the paper, preventing excess curl. Yah baby! Btw, below is the painting in progress of the palette in question..

StandoffProgress3.jpg